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Business R&D performed in US reached $356 billion in 2015

News From NSF - Wed, 09/13/2017 - 11:25

Businesses spent $356 billion on research and development (R&D) performed in the United States in 2015, a 4.4 percent increase over the $341 billion spent in 2014.

Of the total R&D expenditures in 2015, companies spent $22 billion (6 percent) on basic research, $56 billion (16 percent) on applied research, and $278 billion (78 percent) on development. The spending shares did not change from 2014. Those data points come from the Business R&D and Innovation Survey (BRDIS), ...
More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243082&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


This is an NSF News item.

NSF awards $13 million for research on how humans, environment interact

News From NSF - Tue, 09/12/2017 - 17:05

Delta: A place where sediment carried downstream by a river enters the sea, forming a fan of sand or mud.

Although deltas make up just 1 percent of the world's land, they're home to more than half a billion people -- and to fertile ecosystems such as mangroves and marshes. Deltas also serve as economic hotspots. They support much of the world's fisheries and forest products, and are major food production areas for many nations.

Scientists have found that deltas are ...
More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=242942&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


This is an NSF News item.

In wake of hurricanes, floods and wildfires, NSF awards $18.7 million in natural hazards research grants

News From NSF - Tue, 09/12/2017 - 16:20

Hurricane Harvey: It dropped a record-breaking 50-plus inches of rain across parts of Texas and left behind widespread, devastating floods. Following in Harvey's wake, Hurricane Irma has spun another path of destruction.

Beyond the Harvey and Irma disasters, wildfires raged in California this summer, forcing thousands to flee their homes. Now, dozens have perished in Mexico's strongest earthquake in a century.

In the decade from 2003 to 2013, natural disasters around the ...
More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=242941&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


This is an NSF News item.

Four new NSF Engineering Research Centers will advance US health, energy sustainability

News From NSF - Tue, 09/12/2017 - 12:00

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has invested nearly $80 million in four new Engineering Research Centers (ERCs) to create novel technology platforms to address national challenges in health and energy sustainability.

Over the next five years, the centers will create new knowledge and high-tech innovations, as well as transform existing industries in ways that bolster the U.S. economy, support national security and build America's global competitiveness through the preparation ...
More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=242681&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


This is an NSF News item.

NSF announces 14 new PIRE awards to support scientific collaboration in 24 countries

News From NSF - Tue, 09/12/2017 - 08:59

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is pleased to announce 14 new Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) awards, totaling more than $66 million over the next five years.

The awards will fund 14 lead U.S. institutions and U.S. partner institutions for collaborative projects involving international partners in 24 countries: Argentina, Australia, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Cuba, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Malawi, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, ...
More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243068&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


This is an NSF News item.

27 new NSF INCLUDES awards aim to enhance U.S. science and engineering enterprise

News From NSF - Mon, 09/11/2017 - 09:00

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has issued 27 new awards through its NSF INCLUDES program, aimed at enhancing U.S. leadership in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) discoveries and innovations through a commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Today, U.S industries, universities and research centers face 21st-century challenges. They need skilled STEM workers to grow the economy, secure the national defense and advance other national priorities. NSF ...
More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=243055&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


This is an NSF News item.

Learning Programming at Scale: Philip Guo’s research

ComputingEd - Mon, 09/11/2017 - 07:00

I love these kinds of blog posts.  Philip Guo summarizes the last three years of his research in the post linked below.  I love it because it’s so important and interesting (especially for students trying to understand a field) to get a broad explanation of how a set of papers relate and what they mean.  Blog posts may be our best medium for presenting this kind of overview — books take too long (e.g., I did a book to do an overview of 10-15 years of work, but it may not be worth the effort for a shorter time frame), and few conferences or journals will publish this kind of introspection.

My research over the past three years centers on a term that I coined in 2015 called learning programming at scale. It spans the academic fields of human-computer interaction, online learning, and computing education.

Decades of prior research have worked to improve how computer programming is taught in traditional K-12 and university classrooms, but the vast majority of people around the world—children in low-income areas, working adults with full-time jobs, the fast-growing population of older adults, and millions in developing countries—do not have access to high-quality classroom learning environments. Thus, the central question that drives my research is: How can we better understand the millions of people from diverse backgrounds who are now learning programming online and then design scalable software to support their learning goals? To address this question, I study learners using both quantitative and qualitative research methods and also build new kinds of interactive learning systems.

Source: Learning Programming at Scale | blog@CACM | Communications of the ACM


Tagged: computing education research, computing for all, computing for everyone

Personality Tests Are Fun But Don’t Capture Who You Really Are and Should Not Be Part of Hiring

ComputingEd - Fri, 09/08/2017 - 07:00

Annie Murphy Paul has been trying to convince people for years now that personality tests don’t really work — they’re not valid, they’re not reliable, and it’s not clear what they’re measuring.  This issue is important because the Tech industry still believes in tests like these when hiring. (Or so I hear — as a professor, I only know the hiring process from student stories.) They introduce significant bias into hiring. How do we get rid of them?

Twelve years ago, I tried to drive a stake into the heart of the personality-testing industry. Personality tests are neither valid nor reliable, I argued, and we should stop using them — especially for making decisions that affect the course of people’s lives, like workplace hiring and promotion.

But if I thought that my book, The Cult of Personality Testing, would lead to change in the world, I was keenly mistaken. Personality tests appear to be more popular than ever. I say “appear” because — today as when I wrote the book — verifiable numbers on the use of such tests are hard to come by.Personality testing is an industry the way astrology or dream analysis is an industry: slippery, often underground, hard to monitor or measure. There are the personality tests administered to job applicants “to determine if you’re a good fit for the company”; there are the personality tests imposed on people who are already employed, “in order to facilitate teamwork”; there are the personality tests we take voluntarily, in career counseling offices and on self-improvement retreats and in the back pages of magazines (or, increasingly, online).

Source: Personality Tests Are Fun But Don’t Capture Who You Really Are : Shots – Health News : NPR


Tagged: jobs, psychology

Dear Colleague Letter: Life STEM

News From NSF - Thu, 09/07/2017 - 17:53

Available Formats:
HTML: https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17127/nsf17127.jsp?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click
PDF: https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2017/nsf17127/nsf17127.pdf?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

Document Number: nsf17127


This is an NSF Program Announcements and Information item.

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