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Vote for SIGCSE’s Top 10 Papers of the first 50 years

ComputingEd - Fri, 01/18/2019 - 07:00

The ACM Special Interest Group in CS Education (SIGCSE) has created a new “Test of Time” award.  They are trying to define the top 10 papers of SIGCSE’s first 50 years.  You can see the list and vote here.

Because SIGCSE is celebrating their 50th anniversary, ALL SIGCSE conference papers are freely available in the ACM Digital Library through the Symposium (Feb 27-March 2 in Minneapolis).

I don’t know all the papers on the list, but I’m happy that some of my favorites are there. Just mentioning a few:

I do encourage you to check them all out, vote, and download as many papers as you can while they’re all free.

 

 

Chutes and Ladders: Institutional Setbacks on the Computer Science Community College Transfer Pathway

ACM TOCE and InRoads - Thu, 01/17/2019 - 19:00
Louise Ann Lyon, Jill Denner

Community colleges play a large role in educating students who are historically underrepresented in computer science (CS), including women, Latino men, and Black men, as well as post-traditional (older or working) students. In spite of this, there is a dearth of research on the institutional factors that influence whether or not community college students who are enrolled in CS classes and who express an interest in transferring and completing a bachelor’s degree in the field persist. The overused “pipeline” metaphor, which indicates a supply-side lack, has been replaced by many with that of a “pathway.” However, the “pathway” image suggests a general forward-moving trend that can be misleading.
Categories: Education

Chutes and Ladders: Institutional Setbacks on the Computer Science Community College Transfer Pathway

ACM Transactions on Computing Education - Thu, 01/17/2019 - 19:00
Louise Ann Lyon, Jill Denner

Community colleges play a large role in educating students who are historically underrepresented in computer science (CS), including women, Latino men, and Black men, as well as post-traditional (older or working) students. In spite of this, there is a dearth of research on the institutional factors that influence whether or not community college students who are enrolled in CS classes and who express an interest in transferring and completing a bachelor’s degree in the field persist. The overused “pipeline” metaphor, which indicates a supply-side lack, has been replaced by many with that of a “pathway.” However, the “pathway” image suggests a general forward-moving trend that can be misleading.

The Effects of Adding Non-Compulsory Exercises to an Online Learning Tool on Student Performance and Code Copying

ACM Transactions on Computing Education - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
César Domínguez, Arturo Jaime, Jónathan Heras, Francisco J. García-Izquierdo

This study analyzes the impact of adding a review exercises module to an online tool used in a software engineering degree program. The objective of the module is to promote students’ self-learning effort to improve their performance. We also intend to determine if this new feature has any effect on the amount of code copies detected in lab sessions when using the same online tool. Two groups of students were compared quantitatively: the first group used the tool exclusively during lab sessions, whereas the second group had the option of employing the tool's new module to enhance their study. The tool allows us to collect interesting data related to the focus of this research: supplementary work completed voluntarily by students and the percentage of students copying others’ code during compulsory lab sessions.

Digital and Physical Fabrication as Multimodal Learning: Understanding Youth Computational Thinking When Making Integrated Systems Through Bidirectionally Responsive Design

ACM Transactions on Computing Education - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Gabriela T. Richard, Sagun Giri

This article proposes and explores the kinds of computational thinking, creative practices, design activities, and inclusive learning opportunities provided to diverse high school youth when designing integrated systems through simultaneously physically and digitally responsive wearable games and systems. Previous work in this area, conducted by Richard, coined the term “bidirectionally responsive design” (BRD) to describe the design of dual-feedback systems using multiple digital and physical interfaces. BRD also emphasizes using simplified fabrication tools, media and coding platforms, and microcontrollers common in youth content creation communities and makerspaces. This study provides a framework to analyze computational concepts, practices, and perspectives that leverage an integrated systems and multimodal learning approach, such as BRD, adding to, building on, and integrating previous analytic approaches to looking at Scratch coding, media design, physical computing and e-textiles.

A Robust Machine Learning Technique to Predict Low-performing Students

ACM Transactions on Computing Education - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Soohyun Nam Liao, Daniel Zingaro, Kevin Thai, Christine Alvarado, William G. Griswold, Leo Porter

As enrollments and class sizes in postsecondary institutions have increased, instructors have sought automated and lightweight means to identify students who are at risk of performing poorly in a course. This identification must be performed early enough in the term to allow instructors to assist those students before they fall irreparably behind. This study describes a modeling methodology that predicts student final exam scores in the third week of the term by using the clicker data that is automatically collected for instructors when they employ the Peer Instruction pedagogy. The modeling technique uses a support vector machine binary classifier, trained on one term of a course, to predict outcomes in the subsequent term.

Does Computer Game Design and Programming Benefit Children? A Meta-Synthesis of Research

ACM Transactions on Computing Education - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Jill Denner, Shannon Campe, Linda Werner

It is widely believed that there are educational benefits to making computer games, but there is no systematic review of research on this topic. This article describes a meta-synthesis of research on children designing and programming computer games that investigates the extent to which there is evidence of benefits for computer science learning and motivation. Over 400 articles were identified, and 68 articles met the inclusion criteria. A systematic analysis and synthesis across studies showed some evidence that computer game design and programming can lead to changes in programming knowledge, problem solving, and computer science attitudes and confidence. However, most of the evidence described engagement in computing-related practices and did not measure learning.

Identifying Pathways to Computer Science: The Long-Term Impact of Short-Term Game Programming Outreach Interventions

ACM Transactions on Computing Education - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Antti-Jussi Lakanen, Tommi Kärkkäinen

Short-term outreach interventions are conducted to raise young students’ awareness of the computer science (CS) field. Typically, these interventions are targeted at K–12 students, attempting to encourage them to study CS in higher education. This study is based on a series of extra-curricular outreach events that introduced students to the discipline of computing, nurturing creative computational thinking through problem solving and game programming. To assess the long-term impact of this campaign, the participants were contacted and interviewed two to five years after they had attended an outreach event. We studied how participating in the outreach program affected the students’ perceptions of CS as a field and, more importantly, how it affected their educational choices.

A Framework for Teaching Security Design Analysis Using Case Studies and the Hybrid Flipped Classroom

ACM Transactions on Computing Education - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Nikola Luburić, Goran Sladić, Jelena Slivka, Branko Milosavljević

With ever-greater reliance of the developed world on information and communication technologies, constructing secure software has become a top priority. To produce secure software, security activities need to be integrated throughout the software development lifecycle. One such activity is security design analysis (SDA), which identifies security requirements as early as the software design phase. While considered an important step in software development, the general opinion of information security subject matter experts and researchers is that SDA is challenging to learn and teach. Experimental evidence provided in literature confirms this claim. To help solve this, we have developed a framework for teaching SDA by utilizing case study analysis and the hybrid flipped classroom approach.

Learning IS Child’s Play: Game-Based Learning in Computer Science Education

ACM Transactions on Computing Education - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Hadi Hosseini, Maxwell Hartt, Mehrnaz Mostafapour

Game-based learning has received significant attention in educational pedagogy as an effective way of increasing student motivation and engagement. The majority of the work in this area has been focused on digital games or games involving technology. We focus on the use of traditional game design in improving student engagement and perception of learning in teaching computer science concepts in higher education.

Transformative and Troublesome? Students' and Professional Programmers' Perspectives on Difficult Concepts in Programming

ACM Transactions on Computing Education - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Lucy Yeomans, Steffen Zschaler, Kelly Coate

Programming skills are an increasingly desirable asset across disciplines; however, learning to program continues to be difficult for many students. To improve pedagogy, we need to better understand the concepts that students find difficult and which have the biggest impact on their learning. Threshold-concept theory provides a potential lens on student learning, focusing on concepts that are troublesome and transformative. However, there is still a lack of consensus as to what the most relevant threshold concepts in programming are. The challenges involved are related to concept granularity and to evidencing some of the properties expected of threshold concepts. In this article, we report on a qualitative study aiming to address some of these concerns.

The Effects of Adding Non-Compulsory Exercises to an Online Learning Tool on Student Performance and Code Copying

ACM TOCE and InRoads - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
César Domínguez, Arturo Jaime, Jónathan Heras, Francisco J. García-Izquierdo

This study analyzes the impact of adding a review exercises module to an online tool used in a software engineering degree program. The objective of the module is to promote students’ self-learning effort to improve their performance. We also intend to determine if this new feature has any effect on the amount of code copies detected in lab sessions when using the same online tool. Two groups of students were compared quantitatively: the first group used the tool exclusively during lab sessions, whereas the second group had the option of employing the tool's new module to enhance their study. The tool allows us to collect interesting data related to the focus of this research: supplementary work completed voluntarily by students and the percentage of students copying others’ code during compulsory lab sessions.
Categories: Education

Digital and Physical Fabrication as Multimodal Learning: Understanding Youth Computational Thinking When Making Integrated Systems Through Bidirectionally Responsive Design

ACM TOCE and InRoads - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Gabriela T. Richard, Sagun Giri

This article proposes and explores the kinds of computational thinking, creative practices, design activities, and inclusive learning opportunities provided to diverse high school youth when designing integrated systems through simultaneously physically and digitally responsive wearable games and systems. Previous work in this area, conducted by Richard, coined the term “bidirectionally responsive design” (BRD) to describe the design of dual-feedback systems using multiple digital and physical interfaces. BRD also emphasizes using simplified fabrication tools, media and coding platforms, and microcontrollers common in youth content creation communities and makerspaces. This study provides a framework to analyze computational concepts, practices, and perspectives that leverage an integrated systems and multimodal learning approach, such as BRD, adding to, building on, and integrating previous analytic approaches to looking at Scratch coding, media design, physical computing and e-textiles.
Categories: Education

A Robust Machine Learning Technique to Predict Low-performing Students

ACM TOCE and InRoads - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Soohyun Nam Liao, Daniel Zingaro, Kevin Thai, Christine Alvarado, William G. Griswold, Leo Porter

As enrollments and class sizes in postsecondary institutions have increased, instructors have sought automated and lightweight means to identify students who are at risk of performing poorly in a course. This identification must be performed early enough in the term to allow instructors to assist those students before they fall irreparably behind. This study describes a modeling methodology that predicts student final exam scores in the third week of the term by using the clicker data that is automatically collected for instructors when they employ the Peer Instruction pedagogy. The modeling technique uses a support vector machine binary classifier, trained on one term of a course, to predict outcomes in the subsequent term.
Categories: Education

Does Computer Game Design and Programming Benefit Children? A Meta-Synthesis of Research

ACM TOCE and InRoads - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Jill Denner, Shannon Campe, Linda Werner

It is widely believed that there are educational benefits to making computer games, but there is no systematic review of research on this topic. This article describes a meta-synthesis of research on children designing and programming computer games that investigates the extent to which there is evidence of benefits for computer science learning and motivation. Over 400 articles were identified, and 68 articles met the inclusion criteria. A systematic analysis and synthesis across studies showed some evidence that computer game design and programming can lead to changes in programming knowledge, problem solving, and computer science attitudes and confidence. However, most of the evidence described engagement in computing-related practices and did not measure learning.
Categories: Education

Identifying Pathways to Computer Science: The Long-Term Impact of Short-Term Game Programming Outreach Interventions

ACM TOCE and InRoads - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Antti-Jussi Lakanen, Tommi Kärkkäinen

Short-term outreach interventions are conducted to raise young students’ awareness of the computer science (CS) field. Typically, these interventions are targeted at K–12 students, attempting to encourage them to study CS in higher education. This study is based on a series of extra-curricular outreach events that introduced students to the discipline of computing, nurturing creative computational thinking through problem solving and game programming. To assess the long-term impact of this campaign, the participants were contacted and interviewed two to five years after they had attended an outreach event. We studied how participating in the outreach program affected the students’ perceptions of CS as a field and, more importantly, how it affected their educational choices.
Categories: Education

A Framework for Teaching Security Design Analysis Using Case Studies and the Hybrid Flipped Classroom

ACM TOCE and InRoads - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Nikola Luburić, Goran Sladić, Jelena Slivka, Branko Milosavljević

With ever-greater reliance of the developed world on information and communication technologies, constructing secure software has become a top priority. To produce secure software, security activities need to be integrated throughout the software development lifecycle. One such activity is security design analysis (SDA), which identifies security requirements as early as the software design phase. While considered an important step in software development, the general opinion of information security subject matter experts and researchers is that SDA is challenging to learn and teach. Experimental evidence provided in literature confirms this claim. To help solve this, we have developed a framework for teaching SDA by utilizing case study analysis and the hybrid flipped classroom approach.
Categories: Education

Learning IS Child’s Play: Game-Based Learning in Computer Science Education

ACM TOCE and InRoads - Tue, 01/15/2019 - 19:00
Hadi Hosseini, Maxwell Hartt, Mehrnaz Mostafapour

Game-based learning has received significant attention in educational pedagogy as an effective way of increasing student motivation and engagement. The majority of the work in this area has been focused on digital games or games involving technology. We focus on the use of traditional game design in improving student engagement and perception of learning in teaching computer science concepts in higher education.
Categories: Education

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